Software Lost Video: Olaf Lewitz – Increase Trust in your Organization

This video was recorded at Agile Lean Europe (ALE) Unconference 2014 in Krakow.

Olaf talks about how we could increase trust in our organizations by considering that the people we work with are adults. Another topic is de-scaling organizations, so that the people have a happy working place where they can take decisions and further more, they are invited to take decisions.

 

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Software Lost Video: James Shore – Rigurous, Professional Javascript

James Shore is one of the promoters of TDD in Javascript. He is presenting code casts on his website Let’s Code Javascript about how to work effectively in Javascript.

During this video you can see a short glimpse of how to do rigorous, professional Javascript. You can find out how to write tests, about tools you can use to test the same code on multiple browsers, how to take Baby Steps and many more.

 

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Talk: Agile Lean Europe 2014 – Being a Community Bumble-Bee

During the last five years or so I have been travelling Europe and meeting a lot of people in local communities of practice. My main purpose is to teach the local groups and to learn from them. My purpose was and is to pollinate ideas from one community to the other. If more of us do this, our knowledge will grow richer and faster.

The main visible activity of the Agile Lean Europe community is the ALE Unconference that moves each year from city to city. But there are a lot of less visible activities, people meet each other and learn across the country or language borders.

During this talk I want to share my learnings with you about local communities and how rich those experiences can be.

 

Here are the slides for Being a Community Bumble-Bee

Acknowledgements

Many thanks to Thomas Sundberg for proofreading this post.

Software Lost Video: Rachel Davies – Agile Scaling at ALE11 in Berlin

This video is the opening keynote from Agile Lean Europe (ALE) Unconference in 2011, Berlin.

Rachel Davies gives an idea on how Agile works at the moment, and how we cannot really do agile scaling in big enterprises.

 

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Legacy Coderetreat: Episode 6 – Dependency Inversion – Code Cast

Dependency Inversion – code cast

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Code Cast

This is a code cast in Java.

During this code cast you will see how to use the concept of Dependency Inversion on a legacy code base. Dependency Inversion is one way of transforming a tightly coupled system into a system that has a core and many small external dependencies. These external dependencies can be called also plugins. Read more about this concept in my previous blog post.

 

Acknowledgements

Many thanks to Thomas Sundberg for proofreading this post.

Talk: Agile Lean Europe 2014 – Legacy Code is Fear

Legacy code is fear because we fear the unknown. Learn what you need to learn in order to be less scared about legacy code during this talk.

You are a programmer. Someone from the company comes with an idea to add a feature and they are sure this new feature is very easy to add. And it should be. But the code is old. The code is a mess. Nobody in the firm knows any more that part of the system. You need to change that ugly piece of code. You are afraid that you might introduce defects. Legacy code is fear.

 

Here are the slides for the talk Legacy Code is Fear:

Legacy Coderetreat: Episode 5 – Basic Rules of Refactoring – Code Cast

Basic Rules of Refactoring – code cast

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Code Cast

This is a code cast in Java.

We start by checking what can be extracted to another method. The Basic Rules of Refactoring describes the detailed steps I use.

To ensure that we have a safety net, let us start with covering the code with some system tests and then write tests on the newly created method. These are also characterization tests, but they are often simpler than the system tests we wrote before. When the new method have been covered by tests, call it from the initial place where the code was copied from. Run all the system tests. At the end do some manual testing to see that everything works fine.

This technique is very useful to have small and safe steps while refactoring. Remember to never cut and paste. Always duplicate the implementation, cover it with tests and then reroute the call to the new code.

 

 

Acknowledgements

Many thanks to Thomas Sundberg for proofreading this post.

Legacy Coderetreat: Episode 4 – Add Feature on Legacy Code – Code Cast

Add feature on legacy code – code cast

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Code Cast

This is a code cast in Java. We have a new feature request and we need to add it to a legacy code base.

We start by understanding what we need to change. After that we run the existing system tests, that we wrote during the session From Nothing to System Tests. We use a test coverage tool to understand how much of the code is covered with tests. After this step we start writing new system tests until all the code
that will be changed is covered by tests.

When all of the system is covered with tests, we refactor the code to make room for a new feature. We extract a method, then a class and then an interface. The interface is implemented in a new way so that we add the new functionality. Adding the new functionality is done with tests written up-front.

At the end we write one system test to verify that the whole system can work well with the new feature. This is a kind of partial acceptance test that helps us understand if all the system works well together. And of course, manual testing and refactoring is essential before we can say we are done.

See more about the technique in the blog post Add Features on Legacy Code.

 

 

Acknowledgements

Many thanks to Thomas Sundberg for proofreading this post.

Legacy Coderetreat: Part 14 – Document possible Defects with tests

Document possible Defects with Tests

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Purpose

When writing unit tests on legacy code, we often discover behaviours of the system that seem wrong. The main rule is: DO NOT change the production code without being absolutely sure that the change does not introduce defects. Instead we need to mark all the tests that characterize a possible defective behaviour. Let’s look at some ways to document possible defects with tests.

Document Possible Defects with Tests

Document Possible Defects with Tests

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Legacy Coderetreat: Part 13 – Unit Testing on Legacy Code

Unit Testing on Legacy Code

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Purpose

In the previous episode post we extracted a class. The code we just extracted is tested at this moment only with System Tests. Now it’s the time to start writing unit tests, considering that we already have some system tests in place.

Unit Testing on Legacy Code

Unit Testing on Legacy Code

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