Tag Archives: Programming

Pair-programming game: Yes, and…

Yes, and…

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about pair-programming games. To read about more please click see more sessions on pair-programming games.

Purposes:

  • Make the team members that always disagree try to build up on top of the ideas already presented.
  • Some members of your team are very stubborn and you want to show them that there could be other solutions than their own.
  • You want to improve solutions immediately when you see a smaller or larger improvement option.
  • You want beginners to feel they add value when pairing with more experienced people.

Concept

When working in pairs none of the pairs is allowed to delete the code of the other person. We are looking for a common solution, that both of the pairs will agree.

Why? Often I see that the more experienced programmers drive and give their solution as the best one (and sometimes as the only one). But even if you are not experienced, either with the specific language or framework or generally, you might have some good ideas for making the current solution better. In order to work on that attitude you can do ping-pong pairing with the rules Yes, and…

So the rules are:

  • none of the pairs can delete the code of the other.
  • at each step when switching from driver to navigator one needs to improve the existing solution and tests.
  • whenever one of the pairs tries to delete the code, the other needs to say “You should improve the existing one. Please go back and say Yes, and… I will do…“.
  • none of the pairs are not allowed to be angry on this request of not deleting code.
  • only unused code can be deleted, like for example after refactoring the code is not used any more. Both of the pairs must agree that the code can be deleted.

Sessions on this topic should be short, around 30-60 minutes. The first sessions should be supervised by a coach who will make sure the rules are understood and well respected. These sessions might become tiring, so make sure you choose a period of the day when you do not have other hard things to tackle.

Yes, and

Yes, and

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Pair-programming game: Silent Programming

Silent Programming

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about pair-programming games. To read about more please click see more sessions on pair-programming games.

Purposes:

  • Useful when you have talkative people in your team that do not agree or agree but do not write enough code for one task.
  • The code is not easy to read

Concept

The two programmers are not allowed to talk.
All the communication is made through code.
They are not allowed to use paper or write comments in the code or other files.

Silent Programming

Silent Programming

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What is pair programming?

Pair Programming

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about pair programming games. To read about more please click see more sessions on pair programming games.

About

Pair programming is a technique in which two programmers work together to solve a task. They work on one computer, ideally each having their own keyboard in front of them.
There are two roles: driver and navigator.

The driver writes the code and takes the short time decisions. The driver should trust the navigator totally for the long term decisions.

The navigator reads the code of the driver and gives meaningful suggestions on how the code could be better. Also the navigator focuses on the long term decisions and thinks the strategic direction the code moves to.

Both the driver and the navigator need to verbalize their actions and concerns and to speak on the code.

cat-pair-programming

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Pair-programming game: ping-pong

Ping Pong Pair Programming

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about pair-programming games. To read about more please click see more sessions on pair-programming games.

Purposes

  • Learn pair-programming easier
  • Force the “know-it-all” programmer to see other ways of writing code
  • Force the “know-it-all” programmer to collaborate more
  • Push for collective code ownership

Concept

The roles driver and navigator change often inside the pair.
This activity is like a game of ping-pong of the roles between the two members of the pair. They both can take short time decisions while being a driver and can spot strategic design decisions while being a navigator.
Refactoring can be made by any of the programmers on their turn, but only when the code and the tests are stable.

ping-pong

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Brutal Refactoring Game

Brutal Refactoring Game

I wrote a post on the history of Brutal Refactoring Game, you can read it here.

In this blog post I want to tell you more about the workshop and about my experiences while facilitating it. Also I will add some tips for facilitators that want to try themselves this workshop.

The purpose of this workshop is learn what refactoring is, why it is so important to do refactoring often and immediately after you spot some coding smells. Often I ask programmers “when are you doing refactoring?”. The question has a vast number of answers from “when I think I need to”, to “once a month” to something like “every couple of tests”. But seldom I hear that programmers do refactoring all the time, in the minute the tests had passed from red to green”. This is where the format comes into place.

Brutal Refactoring Game

Brutal Refactoring Game

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My Teddy Bear went to XP Days Germany 2012

My Teddy Bear went to XP Days Germany 2012

And here is the proof:

Mosaic Works Teddy Bear

My pairing partner

My teddy bear was willing to go with me to Hamburg because after facilitating the Brutal Refactoring Game, Taking Baby Steps and TDD as if you meant it at the SoCraTes conference I was invited by Marc Philipp to facilitate again one of those sessions at XP Days Germany. Marc he helped me a with the German website, he submitted two sessions for me and in the end the conference organizers chose the Taking Baby Step as a winner.

I was happy I could meet passionate people from Germany at this conference. Then Alex decided to come along with me at the conference.We made all the preparations and off we went to the beautiful city of Hamburg!

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