Tag Archives: Design

Talk: Easier to change CODE

Talk: Easier to change CODE

This is a talk from I T.A.K.E. Unconference 2016, Bucharest.

It is a hands-on talk, where I refactor some code live with the help of the audience.

Talk: Java User Group Łódź – Legacy Code is Fear

Talk: Legacy Code is Fear (Łódź, Poland)

This is a talk from last year, before Global Day of Coderetreat Lodz.

Legacy code is fear because we fear the unknown. Learn what you need to learn in order to be less scared about legacy code during this talk.

You are a programmer. Someone from the company comes with an idea to add a feature and they are sure this new feature is very easy to add. And it should be. But the code is old. The code is a mess. Nobody in the firm knows any more that part of the system. You need to change that ugly piece of code. You are afraid that you might introduce defects. Legacy code is fear.

 

Here are the slides for the talk Legacy Code is Fear:

Programming by Wishful Thinking

Coderetreat: Programming by Wishful Thinking

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about coderetreat sessions.

Purpose

This session introduces the concept of top-down approach of Test Driven Development for a new feature.
By following the steps you will be able to understand how to add thin top-down features that you can show very fast to your customers. Many of the features will work, even though you will not have a fully functional system, just because you have used stubs or fakes for the parts of the system that are not yet implemented.

Programming by Wishful Thinking

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Talk: Agile Lean Europe 2014 – Legacy Code is Fear

Legacy code is fear because we fear the unknown. Learn what you need to learn in order to be less scared about legacy code during this talk.

You are a programmer. Someone from the company comes with an idea to add a feature and they are sure this new feature is very easy to add. And it should be. But the code is old. The code is a mess. Nobody in the firm knows any more that part of the system. You need to change that ugly piece of code. You are afraid that you might introduce defects. Legacy code is fear.

 

Here are the slides for the talk Legacy Code is Fear:

Legacy Coderetreat: Part 11 – Refactoring Rule of Three

Rule of Three

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Purpose

The rule of three says:

Extract duplication only when you see it the third time.

This concept is extremely useful when you want to improve legacy code, refactor in the TDD cycle or just improve existing code that is covered by tests.

The Rule of Three brings higher coherence and more clarity to the system, because the duplicated code starts to be moved into specialized areas. In this way we optimize the code base for changeability.

The Rule of Three prevents from prematurely extracting possible duplication and defers the duplication minimization until we have enough proof.

minimize-duplication

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Legacy Coderetreat: Part 9 – Use Mocking Framework

Use Mocking Framework

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Purpose

By using mocking frameworks we are writing short and easy to read tests. The duplication of test doubles written by hand is minimized by the use mocking framework.

mocking-framework

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Legacy Coderetreat: Part 8 – Extract and Override

Extract and Override

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Purpose

Almost always when needing to test existing code we bump against dependencies that make the system untestable. This technique is useful to extract the static dependencies. After that we can use dependency inversion in order to be able to really test the systems.

With this technique we can transform untestable systems into testable systems, step by step. The steps are small because we want to enable safety while changing the code.

Extract and Override

Extract and Override

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Legacy Coderetreat: Part 7 – Dependency inversion

Dependency Inversion

Blog post series

This blog post is part of a series about legacy coderetreat and legacy code techniques you can apply during your work. Please click to see more sessions about legacy code.

Purpose

As you found out from the previous post, it would be a good idea to refactor in a safe way. This session is about another concept that will prepare for the tough refactorings ahead.

Dependency inversion is one way of transforming a tightly coupled system into a system that has a core and many small external dependencies. These external dependencies can be called also plugins.

Sierpinski_Racket_example Read More →

Coderetreat: The toughest constraint

Coderetreat: The toughest constraint

Ask the attendees what they want

During the Global Day of Coderetreat 2014 (GDCR) I facilitated the event in Turku, Finland. That is when I presented the toughest constraint ever in any coderetreats I facilitated until now.

Since I have a lot of constraints in the list, some time ago I started to ask the attendees how difficult would they want the constraints to be. I am asking them on scale from 1 to 5, 1 being boring, and 5 being extremely difficult, what would they want to do as difficulty.

Another thing I’m doing, stealing the idea from Alex, is to ask the attendees of the coderetreat about the expectations they have. They write one expectation on a sticky note and we look at them and they choose what they want to practice. I tell them about constraints that will generate the kind of learning they want.

Usually during coderetreats the attendees want constraints of the difficulty between 2 and 3. Probably because 1 seems boring and 5 seems scary.

The constraint

Now it was different. They wanted the scary constraints. And they insisted. So here is the constraint.

universe-with-wormholes
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A community event: Bring your own code

Bring your own code

Last month I started a new community event idea. It is called “Bring your own code”, and I “stole” it from what Antoine Vernois is doing in the Toulouse Software Craftsmanship Community. You can find here the event page. Tomorrow we will have the second edition that you can find here. Let’s go a bit into the mechanics of this event type.

Why

  • You have a project and you want a second opinion.
  • Your code needs improvements and you do not know where to start from.
  • You just like to show some awesome code and give it as an example.
Bring Your Own Code

Bring Your Own Code

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